Denver Events

JAS Aspen Snowmass - Labor Day Experience - Maroon 5, Keith Urban, Daryl Hall & John Oates, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, The Roots, Lake Street Dive, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, The Revivalists

Saturday

Sep 2, 2017 – 3:00 PM

2000 Brush Creek Rd.
Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Map

  • Keith Urban
  • Maroon 5
  • Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
  • St. Paul & The Broken Bones
  • Lake Street Dive
  • Daryl Hall
  • John Oates
  • The Revivalists
  • The Roots

More Info


Keith Urban: For Keith Urban’s sixth studio album, Get Closer, the singer-songwriter dives even deeper into the explorations of love and relationships that have established him as one of the world's biggest country music stars—while also extending his rock & roll side, as his hard-charging guitar work reaches new heights. The album is the follow-up to 2009's Grammy-winning and platinum selling Defying Gravity, which entered Billboard's pop and country charts at Number One, and spun off five Top Ten hits, including the chart-toppers "Sweet Thing" and "Only You Can Love Me This Way."

For Urban, the songs on the new album build on ideas that he introduced the last time around. "On Defying Gravity I started touching upon the theme of the courage to love," he says. "It’s all well and good to say, 'I can’t find anybody to love, I wish I could find someone to love.' But do I have the courage to love? Am I willing to open my heart and give the sword to my partner and go, 'All right, I trust you, absolutely and completely?' ”

The ambition for Get Closer is made explicit right on the cover. "The title is multifaceted," says Urban, "because my instincts have always been to run from things that are good for me, to run from love. I have always run from intimacy, and marriage has been a real awakening for me in looking at that very differently. That’s what the title really refers to."

New Zealand-born and Australia-raised, Keith Urban moved to Nashville in 1992. His first American album came as a member of The Ranch (1997), followed by an increasingly accomplished series of multi Platinum-selling solo albums: Keith Urban (1999), Golden Road (2002), Be Here (2004), and Love, Pain & the whole crazy thing (2006). The compilation Greatest Hits: 19 Kids (2008) included such Number One hits as “But For The Grace Of God,” “Somebody Like You” (which was named the top country song of the decade), “Who Wouldn’t Wanna Be Me,” “You’ll Think Of Me,” “Days Go By,” “Making Memories Of Us,” “Better Life,” and “You Look Good In My Shirt.”

Urban has been honored with Grammy Awards, Country Music Association Awards, Academy of County Music Awards, a People’s Choice Award, American Music Award and Australia’s coveted Aria Award. His remarkable musical gifts have also brought him to places where country superstars have rarely gone before, including such very recent appearances as a blazing rendition of the Rolling Stones' classic "Tumblin' Dice" on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, a powerful rendition of "Lean on Me" alongside Kid Rock and Sheryl Crow on the Hope for Haiti telethon and a CMT Crossroads taping with John Mayer.

Yet as Get Closer illustrates, rather than rely on formula, Urban continues to innovate with his music. The sound of the album expands the contrast between old and new styles that has underpinned much of his previous work. "I love using drum machines when I write," he says, " and I love the juxtaposition of a great, funky '80s drum machine with a banjo. Merging those instruments together was something I was really drawn to—we got to a certain point on the record, but I’d like to keep exploring it more."

Some of the sonic experimentation, though, was the result of more than just creative ambition. "I used a lot of new guitars this time, because all of mine got lost in the (middle Tennessee) flood," says Urban. "It was a real blessing in the end, because it got me out of my comfort zone, and I was really focused on making music, and not what we were making it with. I borrowed a few guitars, bought a couple of amps on eBay, and just sort of embraced it—that whatever we’ve got to work with, we’re gonna make it work."

Produced with long-time collaborator Dann Huff, Get Closer blends such chugging rockers as "Long Hot Summer" or the first single, "Put You in a Song," with more emotionally complex and nuanced compositions like "Right on Back to You" and “Luxury of Knowing.”* Urban considers "Luxury," written by Lori McKenna, an especially rich selection. "I love that song, because it’s written from such a unique, open-ended, unsettling place," he says. "I look for songs that people are going to feel something towards—like, 'I’m not in that place now, but I’ve very much been in that place.' I’m trying to find those songs that connect with people."

Urban worked with such previous co-writers as Sarah Buxton, Darryl Brown and Richard Marx on Get Closer. But it was a song by two Nashville writers that captured Urban's own experiences with remarkable precision. "'Without You' really is my life story," he says, with some disbelief. "It's crazy—the fast cars and the guitars and the little girl coming along. It's just an amazing song, and I never would have allowed myself to write it."

As the happy accident of that song indicates, the album's creation was less a matter of Urban chasing a theme than it was staying open to songs that revealed where he is in his own life. "This wasn’t a conscious sort of journey for me," he says. "It was just writing and writing and finding songs that speak to me at this time. I looked for songs that represented all different facets of relationships, but the end result is always stay together, get closer, don’t run. The guy in “Right On Back To You” has driven off—but he’s pulled over and gone, 'I always do this. This is ridiculous because I love this girl, what am I doing?' So he turns around and he goes back. They’re all just reconciling with the need to get closer to intimacy."

The magic of Get Closer, then, isn’t a result of what happened when Keith Urban was in the recording studio; it's about all the other hours of the day. "I just think there’s more love in this album, and that permeated everything and made the music deeper," he says. "I loved making this record. I felt a tremendous sense of balance in my life, as a husband and a father and a musician who gets to go and try to capture all that and harness it and create something."

Maroon 5: One of the most popular and celebrated pop rock bands of the 2000s has been undoubtedly been Maroon 5. Led by frontman Adam Levine, Maroon 5 broke onto the mainstream music scene with the release of their 2002 album, Songs About Jane. Since that time, the band has won three Grammys and sold out tour dates worldwide. With rumors spreading about their latest album, Hands All Over, being their last, Maroon 5 spread their musical wings and tried to explore new territories. If the group is disbanding, they're doing it with a bang by playing international tour dates in 2011 that last until the end of the year.

Adam Levine, Jesse Carmichael, Mickey Madden, and Ryan Dusick all formed a band called Kara's Flowers while attending Brentwood School in Los Angeles. Despite an appearance on Beverly Hills, 90210 and many tour dates, their debut album was such a disappointment that they were dropped from their record contract. Shortly after, Levine and Carmichael went off to Five Towns College in Long Island, where they were exposed to hip-hop and R&B. The duo soon dropped out of college and returned to LA, reuniting with the members of their former band and playing concert dates. While working as a writer's assistant, Levine began writing songs inspired by the failed relationship with his ex-girlfriend. The songs combined Kara's Flowers' pop sounds with the music that he had been exposed to in New York. Despite Octone execs having heard Kara's Flowers' first effort, they agreed to let the band audition again and were blown away by their new sound. Guitarist James Valentine was brought in to take over instrumentation for Levine and their name was changed to Maroon 5 to give them a fresh start.

Upon Songs About Jane's release in 2002, the album received little to no recognition by critics or audiences. But by 2004, people were ecstatic over the album and record sales skyrocketed, eventually going platinum four times in the US. Maroon 5's rise in popularity was partially due to the group's supporting concert dates for John Mayer, who had gone to school with James Valentine. The eventual success of the album was followed by extensive tour dates, which eventually took its toll on drummer Ryan Dusick. He left in 2006 due to injury and was replaced by Matt Flynn of The B-52s. Maroon 5 continued their success in 2007 with the release of It Won't Be Soon Before Long. The album featured a more retro pop sound than the group's previous release, and fans and critics alike responded exuberantly. Maroon 5's latest album, Hands All Over, was released in 2010 and featured more funk and R&B influences.

Unfortunately, Maroon 5 might not get to experiment more with their style, as Adam Levine has hinted that he doesn't want to play music for much longer. If that's true, then fans should check out Maroon 5's tour dates in 2011; and there are dozens upon dozens of them. The band is currently playing concert dates across Asia until the end of May, and after a brief hiatus in June they will return to the US on June 24. After three months of canvassing the United States, Maroon 5 will head to Europe on November 27, where they will begin playing concert dates in Russia and move westward through the continent. 2011 tour dates will end on December 13 in Austria; fans should check Eventful as to not miss a Maroon 5 tour that could be their last.

St. Paul & The Broken Bones: Grit, elemental rhythm, tight-as-a-drumhead playing, and a profound depth of feeling: these are the promises of a great soul band. And St. Paul & The Broken Bones deliver on those promises.

Like many a legendary soul singer, lead singer Paul Janeway, a native of the small town of Chelsea, Alabama, was raised on the gospel side, in a non-denominational, Pentecostal-leaning local church. Virtually no non-religious music could be heard in his devout household. Janeway says, “The only secular music that I heard at all was a ‘70s group called the Stylistics, and Sam Cooke. That was about it. The rest of it was all gospel music. When I was about 10 years old, I was groomed to be a minister. My goal in life until I was about 18 years old was to be a preacher.”

The other members of the Broken Bones are all drawn from Alabama’s deep talent pool. Guitarist Browan Lollar, from the Muscle Shoals area about 100 miles north of Birmingham, previously played with Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit. “We never thought Browan would ever be interested in this band – he was too big-time for us,” says Janeway. “Jesse had met him while he was on tour with another band out of Birmingham. He asked Browan to come to the studio, and he showed up. I think we caught him at the right time. He wasn’t busy, and he said, ‘Man, I really want to be a part of this.’”

Jasper, Alabama, native Andrew Lee signed on via his acquaintance with Phillips. “We just picked him up on the way to the studio,” Janeway recalls. “Jesse said, ‘I know this guy, why don’t I just call him.’ And 30 minutes later, he’s sitting there playing drums on ‘Sugar Dyed.’ Andrew’s just a hell of a drummer.” Brass players Allen Bransetter and Ben Griner are both graduates of the music program at Birmingham’s Samford University. Janeway says his vision of the band always called for a two-man horn section, a la the celebrated Memphis Horns, and he approached Griner, although the latter’s main instrument was tuba. “I told Ben, ‘Man, I’ve got to have horns. Do you think you can play trombone?’ He said, ‘I’ll give it a shot.’ And he brought Allen with him.”

Lake Street Dive: .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... ..THE SHORT VERSION:..

..We started as a free country band- no, not as in a free country like "america is a free country" but country music played....free. Well that didn't work out so now we're just doing originals about exgirlfriends and drunken realizations. We enjoy rehearsals where Mike plays silly things on his drums and eating mad snacks...

....THE LONGER VERSION:..

..How is it that something so unlikely can also be so infectious, so naturally exhilarating? Pulling in familiar elements and irreverently scrambling and recombining them, Lake Street Dive are at once jazz-schooled, DIY-motivated, and classically pop obsessed. Beginning with catchy songs that are by turns openhearted and wryly inquisitive, this northeastern quartet proceeds to inject them with an irresistible blend of abandon and precision. Composed of drummer Mike Calabrese, bassist Bridget Kearney, vocalist Rachael Price, and trumpet-wielding guitarist Mike “McDuck” Olson, Lake Street Dive encompasses a myriad of possibilities within its members’ collective experiences, and the resultant music is a vivid, largely acoustic, groove-driven strain of indie-pop. “It seems the only limitation we have,” Kearney explains, “ is that we try to make music that we would like listening to.”

.. Available November 9th via Signature Sounds, Lake Street Dive’s self-titled third album is not only their national debut – it is also the first album to fully capture their ongoing musical and personal adventure together. As witnessed in a series of ingeniously minimalist performance videos the band has uploaded to YouTube, Lake Street Dive’s sound is marked by McDuck’s ingeniously deployed trumpet parts and snappy rhythm guitar, Kearny’s astonishingly nimble upright bass playing, and Calabrese’s unfailingly musical percussion. Above it all, Price’s vocals are clear and strong, carrying the meaning and melody of the songs with a both declamatory zeal and conversational intimacy. It’s invigorating music that defies genre while simultaneously captivating the head, heart, and feet. ..Hailing from such disparate locales as Tennessee (Price), Iowa (Kearney), Minneapolis (Olson), and Philadelphia (Calabrese), Lake Street Dive first gathered in a room together when they were students at Boston’s New England Conservatory. “Mr. McDuck assembled the four of us, said we were now Lake Street Dive, and we were a ‘free country’ band,” Bridget Kearney remembers. “He wrote this on a chalkboard in the ensemble room that we had our first rehearsal in. We intended to play country music in an improvised, avant-garde style – like Loretta Lynn meets Ornette Coleman. It sounded terrible! But the combination of people and personalities actually made a lot of sense and we had a great time being around each other and making music together.”

.. Lake Street Dive makes the most of pop music virtues: solid, evocative song craft; propulsive grooves; and Price’s disarming, forthright vocals. However, it’s a personal strain of pop that is refracted through the band members’ rich backgrounds: a sinewy Motown bass line is reborn with woody heft on Kearney’s upright, Calabrese’s drumming mixes timekeeping with more adventurous jazz-inflected outbursts, McDuck’s nimble trumpet is an unexpectedly warm counterpoint to Price’s singing. It all makes for a sound with familiar roots, but with a slant that is entirely their own. Lake Street Dive’s eventual artistic breakthrough came not without struggle, and still surprises original instigator Mike “McDuck” Olson. “Now we’re a pop band, leaning very heavily on soul and rock, with hook-y writing, which I never expected,” he concludes. “If I could travel through time, I’d go back six years and play the new record for my younger self, just to assure him that the awkward, new-band phase doesn’t last forever.”..



John Oates: ....

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....Header Photo ©Art Burrows....

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The Revivalists: The formation of The Revivalists was all about chance, but everything since then has been a combination of hard work, awesome music, and friendship. The septet has been playing nonstop since 2007, crafting a genre-hopping sound that rounds out traditional rock instrumentation with horns and pedal steel guitar and mixes the divergent backgrounds of its individual members with the humid, funky undercurrents of the band’s New Orleans home. The result is like English spoken with an exotic accent: familiar, yet difficult to pin down.

Religion aside, a revival is all about the tangible electricity that can only be created when enough like minds are crammed under a single roof for a singular purpose. It’s a spiritual spectacle, a carnival of the divine, a whole greater than the sum of its parts. The same could be said for The Revivalists’ searing live performances. The band has a knack for bringing music to life on a stage, and they have tuned their talents to Swiss-watch precision over years of relentless touring. Their bombastic showmanship is the outgrowth of a desire to connect with audiences on a personal level, and that intimate connection is what elevates their shows above simple entertainment.

True to their name, The Revivalists lean more heavily on the older styles and warmer sounds of the golden age of rock ‘n roll, but the band isn’t afraid to dabble in electronics and sleight-of-studio when it’s right for the song. The group tends not to bother with questions like “does this sound like us?” or “does this fit with our other stuff?”, instead allowing songs to define themselves and take shape organically, each on its own terms. Is this a dark, heavy rock manifesto driven by a steel guitar line that borders on electronica, or is it an airy, acoustic story about star-crossed lovers, rich in vocal harmony and sparsely arranged until the coda? This one’s funky, that one’s sweet, this one’s heavy…

To The Revivalists, it doesn’t matter. They just write songs that they want to play.

The Roots: While most modern hip hop acts have shied away from playing actual instruments, The Roots have made a hugely successful career out of it. Their unique brand of hip hop and soul with a full band (including horn section) has led to sold-out tour dates and four Grammys. In addition to their own acclaimed albums, The Roots have also participated in acclaimed collaborations with artists like John Legend, Erykah Badu, and Duffy. As The Roots continue to evolve and grow, nothing seems too out of the ordinary for this groundbreaking hip hop collective.

The Roots was formed in 1987 by vocalist Black Thought and drummer Questlove while they were friends in high school. The duo began performing around Philadelphia and New York City, gathering a line-up of musicians that would change frequently throughout the band's career; including beatboxer Rahzel. After gathering a following of both hip hop and alternative fans with strategic tour dates, The Roots roared onto the mainstream with the release of Things Fall Apart in 1999. The album quickly went gold and won The Roots their first Grammy that year, and was followed by a performance at Woodstock '99. The Roots' political and social commentary began to grow stronger and stronger beginning with Game Theory in 2006 and continued on their next few albums.

The Roots album, Wake Up!, combined the group's increasing social commentary with the smooth R&B sounds of John Legend; an undeniably winning combination. After a collaborative album with Betty Wright, The Roots released their 13th album, Undun. The record was a concept album, following a man named Redford Stephens who's seduced by a life of crime. After a collaboration with Elvis Costello, the band released ...And Then You Shoot Your Cousin, which satirically dealt with the subject at violence in America.

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